Dog with owner

Dogs

Under the Domestic Animals Act 1994, all dog owners must securely confine dogs to the property. This means your yard must have a closed gate and an escape-proof fence that your dog cannot jump, get under or through. If securely confined, your dog will be safe from traffic injuries or fights with other dogs. It will also be prevented from wandering and becoming lost.

It's also easy to prevent most dog attacks in public places, just by confining dogs. That's good news for the reputation of our pets and for responsible dog owners. A dog of any size or breed can become aggressive when defending its territory or owners. Even a friendly dog may guard the area on or around its property, especially when you are not present.

So for the safety of your dog and everyone else, remember to confine your dog. Backyard is best!

On

Housing your dog

If you wish to keep your dog in a secure enclosure in your property, to ensure that neighbours are not affected by noise or offensive smells, there are restrictions as to where you can place dog enclosures and conditions under which you must maintain the area in which your dog is kept:

  • The area in which your dog is kept must be kept clean at all times
  • Enclosure must be placed no less than 6 metres from the frontage of the land
  • Enclosure must be placed no less than 1 metres from any boundary
  • Enclosure must be placed no less than 3 metres from any dwelling

Dangerous and menacing dogs

A dangerous dog is a dog that council has declared to be dangerous because it has attacked a person or animal and has caused serious injury, or a dog which is kept as a guard dog in a shop or factory.

A menacing dog is one which has been out and rushed at a person while growling and barking but has not actually attacked. Council may decide this dog presents a danger to the public and declare it a menacing dog.

If a dog has been declared dangerous by Council, the owners of these dogs must, by law, take precautions in the way they keep and control their dogs to ensure the safety of the community.

What is a dangerous dog?

A dangerous dog is a dog that council has declared to be dangerous because it has attacked a person or animal and has caused serious injury or a dog which is kept as a guard dog in a shop or factory.

In addition, if your dog is kept for the purpose of guarding non residential premises it is automatically deemed a dangerous dog under the Domestic Animals Act 1994. This status remains for life, even if the dog is no longer used to guard non-residential premises

Dangerous dog restrictions:

  • The dog must be housed in a special enclosure
  • Signs must be displayed at the entrance to the property
  • The dog must wear a dangerous dog collar
  • The dog must be microchipped
  • The dog must be muzzled and on a leash at all times in public

Reporting dangerous dog

To see the reporting process for reporting a dangerous dog, please visit the animal complaints page.

What is a menacing dog?

This is a dog which has been out and rushed at a person while growling and barking but has not actually attacked. Council may decide this dog presents a danger to the public and declare it a menacing dog.

Menacing dogs restrictions:

  • The dog must be muzzled and on a leash at all times in public

Report menancing dogs

To see the reporting process for reporting a menancing dog, please visit the animal complaints page.

Restricted Dog Breeds

Restricted breed dogs are five specific breeds of dogs. They have not attacked a person or animal or displayed signs of aggression, but they are considered a higher risk to community safety than other breeds of dogs. A restricted breed cannot be imported into Australia or to Victoria from interstate.


Restricted dog breeds

  • American Pit Bull Terrier (or Pit Bull Terrier)
  • Fila Brasileiro
  • Japanese Tosa
  • Dogo Argentino
  • Perro de Presa Canario (or Presa Canario)

Only the American Pit Bull Terrier (or Pit Bull Terrier) and one Dogo Argentino are known to be in Victoria.

The State Government has a standard for identifying Pit Bull terrier type dogs. All dogs fitting the standard, except where exemptions are given by the standard, are considered a restricted breed dog.


Conditions for restricted dog breeds

  • These dogs must be muzzled and leashed when outside of the property
  • When outside of the property they must be under the care of a person over 17 years of age
  • Warning signs must be displayed at all entrances to property
  • Dog must be microchipped
  • Dog must be desexed
  • Full price registration applies - no concession or reduced fee applies

Report non -compliance for restricted dog breeds

Any incidences of these laws and conditions not being abided by must be reported as soon as possible. The matter will be investigated by a Local Laws Officer and the outcome advised.

To see the reporting process for reporting non -compliance for restricted breeds, please visit the animal complaints page.

Dog off-leash parks

The City of Greater Dandenong recognises the clear health and social benefits in owning a pet and encourages responsible dog ownership.

One of the key components to maintaining a healthy and socially acceptable dog is good regular exercise. To assist residents in this important task, the council has created a number of areas within the municipality where dogs can be exercised off-leash.

More information on dog off-leash parks